Dr Bryan paton

Dr Bryan paton

Workshop 1 - Bayesian Methods

Dr Bryan Paton is Associate Lecturer, School of Psychology at the University of Newcastle. He has a PhD from Monash University and completed a research fellowship at Monash as well.

This workshop is designed for researchers (PhD, Honours, Post-doc or others) who have an interest in learning how to use Bayesian methods for their data analysis, using freely available software but have had little or no experience with Bayesian methods previously. The workshop will focus on the application of Bayesian methods in the very broad areas of psychology, psychophysics, cognitive neuroscience, social neuroscience and related fields. We will briefly cover some of the theoretical ground and motivation, including some practical demonstrations, touching on topics, such as: What are the current statistical tools that most of us use e.g. Null Hypothesis Significance Testing?, What are the potential issues and problems with such approaches?, What are the candidate approaches to deal with these issues and problems?, What are Bayesian Methods?, Understanding the prior, posterior and likelihood, Sampling methods and software platforms that can enable you to take the first steps e.g. JASP and jamovi

Dr Elise Kalokerinos

Dr Elise Kalokerinos

Workshop 2 - Experience Sampling Methods

Dr Elise Kalokerinos is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) Fellow and Lecturer in the School of Psychology, University of Newcastle. Her research primarily investigates emotion regulation, which is the variety of processes through which people influence their emotion. Elise completed her PhD in social psychology at the University of Queensland and completed two postdocs in Europe.

This workshop will introduce experience sampling methods (ESM; also called ecological momentary assessment). ESM involves sampling participants’ experiences in natural environments, in real-time (or close to it), and on multiple measurement occasions (often using smartphone technology). These methods allow insight into participants’ momentary states and the contexts in which these states occur, thus letting researchers to “capture life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, & Rafaeli, 2003). ESM increases ecological validity, reduces recall bias, and allows researchers to capture dynamic within-person processes.  In this workshop, we’ll discuss when ESM is useful, and the primary choices and considerations involved in study design and data collection.